THE HANDYMAN ZONE
"Hammer it Out in the Zone"

• HOME IMPROVEMENT ZONE • APPLIANCE ZONE • CAR ZONE •

HOME

 

HOMEHOW-TO PAGESBOOK STORELittle Giant LaddersFREE STUFF10% off purchase of off ALL major appliances $299 LINK TO US

HUNGRY? TRY PlusRecipes.com

Custom Search

 

Share |

             

 

 

 Purity Products Triple Greens

 

 Turn 21 today!

 

 

 

 no one deals like we do!

 

   Sign up NOW, Receive an Additional 3 Months FREE!

Hey, you're in the home improvement zone--YOUR HANDYMAN ZONE!

Walls Category: Interior Walls: Drywalls / Wallboards

Problem:

Hole, relatively big in size, in the drywall/wallboard.

Tools / Materials (See Below for Applicability):

  • Appropriate piece of replacement drywall

  • Screwdriver

  • Power drill with the appropriate drill bits (for drilling pilot holes and screwing drywall screws)

  • Drywall screws (1-5/8" fine drywall screws)

  • Drywall keyhole saw

  • Carpenter's framing square

  • Carpenter's level

  • Carpenter's knife

  • Straightedge

  • Tape measure

  • Scrap wood pieces (preferably pieces of a 2x4, and must be small enough to fit in the cut drywall opening so as to add to the studs in order to act as a solid place to which the screws of the newly installed drywall piece will penetrate for secure holding of the drywall piece)

  • Drywall compound

  • Drywall taping

  • Wide drywall taping knife (about 6 inches wide)

  • Fine sandpaper

  • Drywall pole sander

  • Pencil

  • Vacuum

  • Broom

  • Broom dustpan

Solution:

 

You have a hole in your your drywall/wallboard, and it's pretty big because the spreading of just drywall joint compound over the whole with a joint knife won't be enough--the compound will just fall through if you try because there is no "backing" for stabilization.  You'll need to create that stabilization.

Caution: Of course, when dealing with sharp objects, such as a power drill, drywall keyhole saw, make sure you take precautions; read all product manufacturer instructions.

Repairing a hole, relatively big in size, in drywall can be done in a few steps, and here's how:

  1. Because the hole is too big for a compound patch, you'll need to install a nice rectangular drywall repair piece in place of this hole.  This requires the hole to get purposely bigger because you'll need to do essentially three things overall in this repair process:  Find the closest wood studs to the hole, cut a nice rectangular opening around this hole, and have a replacement drywall piece cut to size to be installed in place of the hole so as to make the drywall whole again (without a hole).

Having said the above, use your hands to carefully break little chunks off around the hole to enlarge it just enough, if not already, to determine where the closest wood studs are, and to make sure no wires are in the vicinity of this hole and repair area before you make cuts.

Assessing generally where the closest studs are in relation to the hole and determining that there are no wires in the way, you're ready to carefully make your cut-preparatory markings around the hole.

  1. Cut preparation: With the intention of cutting a rectangular opening around the hole to the extent the rectangular opening exactly borders a wood stud on both sides, use a pencil and a carpenter's level to mark out the cutting lines for this rectangular opening to happen accordingly, along with using a carpenter's framing square to ensure the cutting lines form perfect 90° corners for a clean rectangular cut.

  2. Having made the appropriate pencil markings to guide the cutting of your rectangular opening, use either a drywall keyhole saw or carpenter's knife and a straightedge to actually cut the rectangular opening along such markings used as cutting guides.

  3. Having marked your cut markings and done the actual cutting of the rectangular opening correctly, you will find that the left and right sides of the rectangular opening are about flush with the sides of the wood studs.  At this point, you'll need to add just a bit of wood to these studs in order to provide a solid place to which the screws of the drywall piece that is to be installed will penetrate for secure holding of the drywall piece.  To do this, you'll need to do the following:  While holding an appropriately-sized wood piece against one of the wood studs with one hand, use the other hand to operate a power drill attached with the appropriate drill screw bit to screw in drywall screws through this wood piece and into the wood stud, all in an effort to permanently secure the wood piece to the wood stud; do the same for the other wood stud with another similarly sized wood piece.

  4. Now, cut to size the actual piece of drywall that will become the rectangular drywall replacement piece installed in place of the original hole (and now the rectangular opening). Use a tape measure to measure the rectangular opening in the wall. Use these measurements as the dimensions to which the piece of replacement drywall will be cut to size, using a straightedge and a pencil to mark these cut-dimensions on the drywall from which the replacement drywall piece will be cut. Once the markings are made, use a carpenter's knife or drywall keyhole saw to make the actual replacement piece cut, following these cut markings.

Alternatively, if at all possible, instead of measuring the rectangular opening altogether, better yet you can use the cut-out piece that came from the rectangular opening as a template guide by placing it on the drywall sheet that will be used to cut the replacement drywall piece, either tracing its exact size thereon with a pencil for follow-up cutting or actually holding it down on the drywall sheet while immediately going over it with a carpenter's knife or drywall keyhole saw, cutting to size an exact replica in this process. 

  1. With the cut-to-size replacement drywall piece in hand, carefully insert it in the rectangular opening, making any trimming cuts of the piece as are necessary with a carpenter's knife until it snugly fits in the opening.

  2. Now securely fasten the replacement drywall piece to the wood-piece extensions of the wood studs on both sides of the replacement drywall piece.  You can do this through either of two ways:  1) Use a power drill with the appropriate drill bit to drill in pilot holes that will ultimately be occupied by drywall screws screwed in through the use of a screwdriver, all so that the screws secure the replacement drywall piece to the wood-piece extensions; or 2) Use a power drill with the appropriate drill screw bit to immediately screw in drywall screws through this replacement drywall piece and into the wood studs.  When screwing in these drywall screws, keep this in mind:  Along both sides of the replacement drywall piece, drywall screws should be screwed in every 1.5 to 2 inches or so.

  3. Next, using a wide drywall taping knife, apply the first layer of drywall compound over all the seams of the drywall repair (i.e., where the edges of the replacement piece meet the edges of the entire drywall overall).

Wet the drywall taping, as may be applicable, per the taping manufacturer's instructions, and then place this taping over all the seams; you can do this one side/seam at a time, cutting the taping with a carpenter's knife to size for each seam and placing each one over each seam, one at a time. Use the wide drywall taping knife at an angle to go over each placed taping on the wall so as to gently flatten the surface, permitting some, but not all, of the underlying compound to seep out of the edges of the taping; gently scrape up this "excess" compound with the taping knife and spread it over the taping itself so as to progressively camouflage the taping with the drywall.

While holding each taping over the wall, you can carefully go over each taping strip with an additional drywall compound spread, as may be necessary to cover such taping, using the the wide drywall taping knife.

  1. Allow this first applied layer of drywall compound to cure/dry onto the wall for about 24 hours or otherwise per the drywall compound manufacturer's instructions.

  2. Upon 24 hours passing or any other time period provided by the drywall compound manufacturer, apply a second layer of the drywall compound over the seams and overall repair area, extending the compound spread about 6 inches beyond the first compound layer coverage, using the wide drywall taping knife.

  3. Allow this second applied layer of drywall compound to cure/dry onto the wall for about 24 hours or otherwise per the drywall compound manufacturer's instructions.

  4. Upon drying per the applicable time period, using the wide drywall taping knife, scrape off any dried abnormal bumps of accumulated drywall compound.

  5. Follow up with a third layer of drywall compound that extends another 6 inches beyond the second compound layer coverage, using the wide drywall taping knife.

  6. Allow this third applied layer of drywall compound to cure/dry onto the wall for about 24 hours or otherwise per the drywall compound manufacturer's instructions.

  7. Sand the repaired drywall area for a finish touch:  Use a drywall pole sander, equipped with fine sandpaper, to lightly sand over the affected area as much as may be necessary; you should not have to do too much sanding, of course.  After doing this, use a broom, dustpan and vacuum, as necessary, to remove and clean up all created debris.

That's what it takes to repair a hole, relatively big in size, in drywall.  You may choose to paint over this repaired area with matching paint as part of a subsequent project.

Ed the Handyman

            &

Your Handyman Zone Team

 

Find Drywall & Insulation Contractors. Get Up to 4 Quotes Now. It's Quick, Free, and Easy!

 

                                                         

Share |

 

 

 

 

HOMEHOW-TO PAGESBOOK STOREFREE ESTIMATES

 

ABOUT ED THE HANDYMANCONTESTSCONTACT USLINK TO USFREE STUFF

 

 

Use of/Visit to this site constitutes the User's Understanding of and Consent to Disclaimers, Terms & Ad Disclosures | Privacy Policy

All links found on this site should be considered as Ad links.  See Ad Disclosures for more details.

 Protected by Copyscape Online Plagiarism Checking Tool

Monitored for Copyright Compliance