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Video Games Category: Nintendo Wii Fit / Wii Sports

Hobby / Travel:

How Nintendo Wii Fit / Wii Sports is being used as a fun, all-ages exercise machine and also a therapeutic machine, too.

Guide:

Video games have long been criticized as a contributor to juvenile delinquency and childhood obesity, among other life's vices.  However, over the recent years, Nintendo, a worldwide leader in video game productions, has strived towards producing video game systems designed to get video game enthusiasts off the sofa and up and about, requiring them to use much more than their fingers, but also their legs and arms as part of incorporating a physical workout in playing the newly developed Nintendo games.

The latest end result of Nintendo's efforts has been the design of the Nintendo Wii (phonetics: "we," the English pronoun) video game console system.  The Wii succeeds Nintendo's predecessor video game console, the Nintendo GameCube.  The Wii is notable for its wireless controller known as the Wii remote.  This wireless remote is the tool that enables--and even persuasively requires--game enthusiasts to get off the sofa and become physically active in the playing of a game more so than ever before.  Along with this is the Internet connectivity feature that provides the Wii with online capabilities, from obtaining system updates to allowing a player to play with or against others all over the world.

The additional developments of Wii Fit and Wii Sports to the overall Wii system have permitted the system to make even greater notable and relatively unprecedented strides in the exercise realm than ever before.  Specifically, Wii Fit is a video game specially developed for the Wii with an added player instrument, a Wii balance board, that is similar to that of a bathroom scale. The board specifically determines your game movement, center of gravity, weight and body mass index.  The board, along with its software, tracks this information during the course of your playing The Wii Fit game activities over a period of time to provide you with your fitness progress.  The board is used to play the various 48 physical activities found as part of the Wii Fit game, including the following: aerobic exercises, balance exercises, strength training and yoga poses.  In the course of exercising to these game activities on the Wii, in addition to the obvious getting-fit incentive, the game incentive is being able to obtain "fit credits" along the way to be used towards playing all aspects of such game activities.

Wii Sports is another sports game developed by Nintendo for the Wii system as part of the overall Wii series initiative of targeting fitness.  With the use of the Wii remote, a player is able to simulate playing five sports, including the following:  baseball, bowling, boxing, golf, and tennis.  The games of Wii Sports are structured so that even the most novice--who do not know the rules of a sport in reality--can play them with relative ease.  Like with Wii Fit, Wii Sports allows for the tracking of a player's fitness and training progress.

So far, the Wii system has seemed to have already succeeded in various respects:  In January 2008, ABC News reported that there had been definite signs that the Wii had attracted an upheaval of new game enthusiasts of the previously unlikeliest sort:  ordinary women and the elderly.  This is in addition to the fact that the Wii has been shown to create a bonding effect with family members in addition to providing a means to assist in the facilitation of exercise and the loss of weight.  For example, in December 2007, it was widely reported that Liverpool John Moore's University of the United Kingdom conducted a study of the Wii and its effects on teenaged players that concluded with these positive results:  While it is no substitute for playing a sport for real, the Wii may be considered as part of one's weight management tools to the extent the study found players expended 2% more energy playing on the Wii than on any other game console system, and that the amount of weight that could be possibly lost in a year in actively playing on the Wii could very well be around 27 pounds.  In all, the Wii has had phenomenal success in helping people from all walks of life around the world suffering from various ailments:  The Wii has reportedly been used as a physical therapeutic aid in rehabilitating an injured boxer, stroke victims, and injured soldiers.

Given the above, the Wii may be an exciting and rewarding video game console system for you and/or your family to try.

Ed the Handyman

            &

Your Handyman Zone Team

                                                         

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